Third-person effects of Internet stock recommendations

Main Article Content

Jaemin Jung
Samsup Jo
Cite this article:  Jung, J., & Jo, S. (2013). Third-person effects of Internet stock recommendations. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 41(9), 1435-1444.


Abstract
Full Text
References
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgments
Author Contact

In this study we empirically tested the effects of the use of third-person perceptions in the context of the stock market using a sample of 109 professional stock traders and 130 members of the lay public. Findings show that people perceived anonymous information recommending stocks on the Internet as having a greater influence on others than on themselves. Additionally, participants demonstrated a third-person perception when “others” were novice investors with little knowledge or experience in stock trading than when “others” were presumed to be experienced investors. Professional stock traders perceived a greater influence on others than did the lay public. We also found support for the relationship between third-person perceptions and attitudes toward support for warnings about anonymous information.

Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.
Please login and/or purchase the PDF to view the full article.

Article Details