Alibi believability: The impact of salacious alibi activities

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Meredith Allison
Kyla R. Mathews
Stephen W. Michael
Cite this article:  Allison, M., Mathews, K., & Michael, S. (2012). Alibi believability: The impact of salacious alibi activities. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 40(4), 605-612.


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We examined how alibi strength and a suspect’s claim of engaging in salacious alibi activities impact alibi believability. Specifically, we investigated whether an alibi of watching an X-rated movie versus watching a regular movie caused differences in alibi believability, perceived likelihood of guilt, and ratings of various character traits. Undergraduates read a crime description and a mock transcript before completing a questionnaire (adapted from Olson & Wells, 2004). Alibis were rated as more believable when the suspect provided a salacious alibi. Suspects with salacious alibis were rated as more honest, open, and less likely to be guilty.

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