Academic attributional style, self-efficacy and gender: A cross-cultural comparison

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Selin Metin Camgoz
Oznur Ozkan Tektas
Irem Metin
Cite this article:  Metin Camgoz, S., Tektas, O., & Metin, I. (2008). Academic attributional style, self-efficacy and gender: A cross-cultural comparison. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 36(1), 97-114.


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The relationships between academic attributional style (AAS), self-efficacy, gender and culture were investigated in this study. Three research questions “Is AAS influenced by self-efficacy, gender and culture?”, “Does AAS operate in the same way in two different cultures?”, and “How do AAS dimensions (internality, stability, globality) vary?” were examined with a sample of 261 university students studying in Turkey and Britain. Regression results showed that gender and culture were separately significant predictors of pessimistic AAS. However, self-efficacy did not add significantly to the prediction of AAS. Regarding AAS dimensions, MANOVA revealed a significant main effect of culture, suggesting that British students have more pessimistic attributional styles characterized by the internality dimension in explanations of negative events. Suggestions for future studies are discussed.

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