Self-service versus human interaction in private consumption: The moderating role of brand personality

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Seojin Stacey Lee
Kiwan Park
Yaeri Kim
Cite this article:  Lee, S., Park, K., & Kim, Y. (2022). Self-service versus human interaction in private consumption: The moderating role of brand personality. Social Behavior and Personality: An international journal, 50(4), e11322.


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We explored how consumer attitudes toward service delivery types (self-service technology vs. face-to-face) differ in a private consumption context depending on the brand personality (underdog brand vs. top-dog brand). Using banking service (Study 1) and hotel service (Study 2) scenarios, we empirically investigated the interaction effects between service delivery types and brand personalities on consumer attitudes. The results indicate that for humanized underdog brands consumers showed a more positive attitude toward self-service technologies than toward face-to-face services. However, for the top-dog brands there were no significant moderation effects. Thus, when managers in the marketing field are planning to regulate new directions for their service policy, they need to be very cautious by considering both consumption context and brand personality. We have theoretically and practically expanded the existing literature on service delivery by focusing on private consumption services.

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